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Modules and Courses

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The 12-month M.A. in International Business and Policy (MA-IBP) program consists of six, one-week in-person modules. Four of the modules take place on Georgetown’s Washington, D.C., campus, with one held each quarter. Two modules will be held outside of the United States in Santiago, Chile and Frankfurt, Germany.

Each in-person module consists of three courses: one McDonough School of Business course, one Walsh School of Foreign Service course, and one theme course incorporating several industry practitioners, site visits, and relevant coursework pertaining to the current events of the region. Some examples of module themes include, “The Mindset of a Global Manager,” “Global Business Strategy” and “The Future of the Global Economy.”

Below is an overview of the academic curriculum for the inaugural cohort:

Module 1: Introduction to the Global Economy, Washington, D.C. (January 2017) 
Module 2: The Mindset of a Global Manager, Washington, D.C. (March 2017)
Module 3: A Small, Open Economy Goes Global, Santiago, Chile (May 2017)
Online Course 1 (June 2017)
Module 4: Global Business Strategy, Washington, D.C. (July 2017)
Module 5: Crisis and the Future of Europe, Frankfurt, Germany (August 2017)
Online Course 2 (October 2017)
Module 6: The Future of the Global Economy and Graduation, Washington, D.C. (December 2017)*
 
*The Social Action Project will be introduced at the start of the program. Students will work on their projects independently and with their faculty adviser throughout the year, ultimately sharing their findings during Module 6.
 
See below for a detailed illustration of the courses included in each module.
MODULE 1: INTRODUCTION TO THE GLOBAL ECONOMY, WASHINGTON, D.C.
Examines the concept of globalization from both a country and company perspective. Students are introduced to frameworks of political economy, economic openness, and market access.
  • Business, Government, and Global Economy (Foreign Service) – Examines the political economy of international trade and investment by looking at the interaction of firms and governments in the global economy with an emphasis on trade- and investment-related issues and the rules pertaining to them.​
  • Multinational Strategy (Business) – Learn how to compete globally by creating a competitive advantage for a multinational firm, patterns of foreign direct investment, and managing the process of globalization.
MODULE 2: THE MINDSET OF A GLOBAL MANAGER, WASHINGTON, D.C.
Re-conceptualizes the business and politics of globalization for the manager working in a multinational corporation, international NGO, or government agency.
  • The Political Economy of Globalization (Foreign Service) – Using current case studies, the course offers an in-depth look and political and country risk factors with the goal of learning to identify risks and weigh their trade-offs in advance of events.
  • International Trade and Business (Business) – Provides an understanding of the causes and consequences of financial trade and its impact on foreign policy, as well as how trade policies affect trade patterns, the distribution of income, social welfare, and economic growth. National, regional, and global governance of international trade are discussed.
MODULE 3: A SMALL, OPEN ECONOMY GOES GLOBAL, SANTIAGO, CHILE
Investigates Chile’s decisions to open up to investment and free trade. Highly regarded in Latin America, Chile presents a model to evaluate when considering other developing countries and their global aspirations.
  • Comparative Politics, Development Economics (Foreign Service) – Investigates the politics and economics of development to determine why some enjoy prosperity and others are mired in persistent poverty. Compares growth and development experience across regions and introduces methods to evaluate the impact of development policies and programs.
  • Organizational Management and Cross-Cultural Communications (Business) -- This course will begin with a framework for comparing, analyzing, and understanding national cultural differences. Then, drawing on ideas regarding cultural intelligence, cross-cultural competence, and global dexterity, it will focus on effective communication, teamwork, and leadership in an international context.
MODULE 4: GLOBAL BUSINESS STRATEGY, WASHINGTON, D.C.
Evaluates and develops relevant frameworks for devising global strategy for business and politics. Students observe the challenges and opportunities presented by international expansion.
  • Data (Big and Small) and Data Analytics (Foreign Service) – This course will equip students with the analytical framework to engage in greater evidence-based decision-making. Students will examine the latest trends in data-based analytics performed by modern businesses and governments.
  • International Marketing (Business) – A case study-based course that teaches how to apply advanced marketing concepts and tools in global markets and how to handle complex coordination problems and subtle cultural issues involved in establishing a presence in foreign markets.
MODULE 5: CRISIS AND THE FUTURE OF EUROPE, FRANKFURT, GERMANY
Considers the possible scenarios emerging from current financial and political uncertainty in Europe. With issues such as “Brexit," the Euro, and immigration, Europe will never be the same. How can organizations prepare for the imminent changes to the most global institution of all time?
  • Institutions, Diplomacy and International Business (Foreign Service) -- Examines how developments in international politics affect the international business environment.  Investigates the sources of international instability and possible solutions, including military, economic, and diplomatic.
  • Global Investments and Operations (Business) – Focuses on the management of logistics in firms that source, produce, distribute, and market in multiple nations, as well as identifying and analyzing the factors that differ across nations and influence the effectiveness of this function.
MODULE 6: THE FUTURE OF THE GLOBAL ECONOMY, WASHINGTON, D.C.
Aggregates perspectives on the future challenges presented by market access, trade, investment, international institutions, currency integration, and anti-globalization.
  • Global Cooperation (Foreign Service) – Taking a political economy perspective, the course considers how governments interact on the international stage and uses analytical tools and historical data to understand how the dramatic rise of China has changed the global balance of power.
  • Politics of Economic Transformation (Business) – This course examines the role that domestic, foreign, and international institutions play in the transformation of a nation's economy.
  • Social Action Project – Under the mentorship of a faculty member, students will research and develop an experiential field project that benefits or inspires social change and applies knowledge gained in the classroom to a real-world problem or issue in the student’s own community or the world.