Managing the Performing Arts in Times of Economic Challenge; Georgetown University's McDonough School of Business to Host Arts P

March 09, 2009

Georgetown University's McDonough School of Business to Host Panel Discussion March 16, 2009

WHAT: Georgetown University's McDonough School of Business to host panel discussion on "Managing the Performing Arts in Times of Economic Challenge," featuring:

  • Welcome: George G. Daly, dean of Georgetown's McDonough School of Business
  • Moderator: Murray Horwitz, award-winning performer, lyricist, and performing arts manager
  • Anna Harwell Celenza, chair, Department of Performing Arts, Georgetown University
  • Joseph Volpe, former general manager of the Metropolitan Opera
  • Luca Zan, professor of management and director of the Program on Management and Innovation of Cultural Organizations, University of Bologna

WHEN: Monday, March 16, 2009 at 5:00 p.m.

Reception to follow

R.S.V.P.: Seating is limited. To RSVP, e-mail your name to MSBevents@msb.edu. Media should contact Brett West of LiveWire Media Relations at bwest@livewiredc.com or at 703-519-1600, ext. 100.

WHERE: Georgetown University

Riggs Library, Healy Hall 3rd Floor

37 & O Street

Washington, D.C. 20057

BACKGROUND:
Anna Harwell Celenza is chair of the Department of Performing Arts at Georgetown University. Dr. Celenza is a prolific author, master teacher, and decorated researcher working in genres as varied as scholarly works, public radio commentary, music journalism, concert narration, and children's books on Ellington, Beethoven, Gershwin, and Bach. A small sampling of her topics includes the intersection of music and politics, artistic communities of the past and present, music in D.C., and music aesthetics.

Murray Horwitz, performer, lyricist and veteran performing arts manager, began his career as a clown for Ringling Brothers, Barnum and Bailey. Since then he has written for opera (The Great Gatsby) and Broadway (Ain't Misbehavin' ), performed one-man shows (Sholem Aleichem), and appeared on television. He also served as head of NPR's cultural programming and the AFI Silver Theatre. Horwitz has won a National Medal of Arts and three Peabodies, as well as Tony, Obie, Grammy, and New York Drama Critics' Circle awards. He has collaborated with Wynton Marsalis and written works for HBO, PBS, 20th Century Fox, and Universal Pictures. In 2000, the government of France made Horwitz a Chevalier of the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres.

Joseph Volpe was general manager of the Metropolitan Opera from 1990 to 2006, having started at the Met as a carpenter in 1964. During his tenure, the Met gave four world premieres, re-entered the commercial recording field, instituted an education program for children, introduced "Met Titles" (non-intrusive supertitles), maintained sound fiscal management, and had the longest period of labor peace in the company's history. Under Volpe's leadership, the Met developed a software program, Tessitura, which uses a single database to manage marketing, fundraising, and ticketing. More than 80 performing arts organizations worldwide now use this system. For the past four years Volpe has taught "Managing in the Performing Arts" at New York University's Stern School of Business.

Luca Zan is a professor of management and director of the Program on Management and Innovation of Cultural Organizations at the University of Bologna. Dr. Zan's wide-ranging research includes the transformation of Italian opera houses from public institutions to private foundations, reform imposed by legislation calling for a more managerial approach, and the introduction of private capital. He has done field work, teaching, and writing around a variety of cultural issues, including the British Museum, archaeology museums and sites in China, institutional transformation of the Egyptian museums in Turin, municipal museums in Milan, Bologna, and Venice, and site management in Machu Picchu. He also is interested in management and accounting history of 16th-century Venice.

About Georgetown's McDonough School of Business:
Georgetown University's McDonough School of Business is a premier business school in the nation's capital. Founded in 1957 to educate undergraduate business students through the integration of liberal arts and professional education, the school annually welcomes some 1,400 undergraduates, 600 MBA students, and 500 participants in its executive education programs. For more information about Georgetown's McDonough School of Business, visit http://msb.georgetown.edu.