Faculty News

Georgetown McDonough's faculty are known worldwide for their research, expertise, and commitment to their students. They regularly lend their knowledge to the media, hearings on Capitol Hill, and to leading organizations.

McDonough Faculty News

In the News item

The Economic Impact Of The Coronavirus: A Time Bomb?

February 13th, 2020

Before the battle of the governments of the world to contain the impact of the spread of the virus, the origin and the spread occur in a country that is intimately related to supply chains around the world. The discussion with José Guerrero-Cusumano, professor at the Georgetown University business school. Translated from Spanish.

In the News item

Tesla Raises Capital Two Weeks After Elon Musk Said It Wasn’t Needed

February 13th, 2020

“It’s not surprising when a company does a re-offering when the stock price is high,” said Reena Aggarwal, a professor of finance and director of the Center for Financial Markets and Policy at Georgetown University. “They raise debts when interest rates are low. When market conditions are right, it makes sense for companies to raise capital.”

In the News item

The Coronavirus: A New Risk of Trade

February 8th, 2020

An op-ed by Michael Czinkota, associate professor: “Over the past three generations, analyses of trade have indicated that speed of innovation and change is supportive of improved living standards. Growth of a country’s international trade has typically been more rapid than growth of the domestic economy.”

In the News item

What is 5G?

February 7th, 2020

Larry Downes, Georgetown University senior industry and innovation fellow, explained the various differences between wireless network generations. Going from 2G to 3G, he said, made phones into devices that could not only make calls but also allow users to browse the internet at faster speeds and download videos. When 4G became available, internet browsing speeds got even faster and video quality improved significantly.

In the News item

Want To Be A Good Leader? Go Home!

February 7th, 2020

Furthermore, the researchers found that employees were “1.1 times more likely to stay with an organization” if their bosses encouraged them to take breaks and vacations and exhibited those behaviors themselves. “Our research,” wrote Tony Schwartz and Christine Porath, “suggests a deceptively simple formula for leaders: the better you take of your people — and yourself — the better they will take care of the business.”

In the News item

Six Ways To Be A More Thoughtful Leader

February 7th, 2020

Gibbings cited Georgetown University’s Associate Professor of Management Christine Porath who found that respect tops the charts for employees.

In the News item

What Is 5G?

February 4th, 2020

Larry Downes, Georgetown University senior industry and innovation fellow, explained the various differences between wireless network generations. Going from 2G to 3G, he said, made phones into devices that could not only make calls but also allow users to browse the internet at faster speeds and download videos. When 4G became available, internet browsing speeds got even faster and video quality improved significantly.

In the News item

When You Host The Super Bowl, Every Minute Is A Commercial

February 4th, 2020

“The economic impact to a city, be it Miami or any other city, is quite significant because you have hundreds of thousands of people descending onto one city, who are going to spend a certain amount of money,” said Arthur Dong, a business professor at Georgetown University. “Whenever you have visitors come in from outside the city there is a huge net inflow of tax revenue into the city’s coffers.”

In the News item

Despite Super Bowl LIV’s Marketing Deja Vu, Several Ads Break Out

February 3rd, 2020

“Tide was noticeably clever with four spots bringing back it’s ‘later fashion’ in unexpected but appropriate spots throughout each of the four quarters,” Simon Blanchard, professor of marketing at Georgetown’s McDonough School of Business, said in emailed comments. “It’s a lot of repeated exposure and really added to the impact for people who had seen the first commercial.”

In the News item

Exploring The SEC Plan That May Change How Over-The-Counter Securities Are Quoted

February 3rd, 2020

“The Commission should explicitly state…that broker dealers may quote securities traded on the OTCQX, OTCQB, and Pink-Current sections of the OTC market without any additional regulatory requirements or record-keeping burdens,” wrote Jim Angel, associate professor of capital markets at Georgetown. “These market segments already have explicit publicly-available information requirements. Broker-dealers should be able to rely on the listing status of such securities without any additional record keeping requirements.”

In the News item

Super Bowl Ads

February 3rd, 2020

Ronnie Goodstein, associate professor of marketing, discusses Super Bowl advertisements.

In the News item

Auto Brands’ Super Bowl Spots Dominated By Drive-By Celebs

February 2nd, 2020

“Almost every single car commercial looks like every other car commercial,” said Christie Nordhielm, a marketing professor at Georgetown University. “You could literally take the brand name out of one and put it on another.… It’s the same thing over and over again.”

In the News item

Trump And Reagan: Whose Trade Policy Wins?

January 31st, 2020

An op-ed by Michael Czinkota, associate professor: “After signing the United States – Mexico – Canada agreement and ‘Phase 1’ of the China trade deal, President Trump has now moved his international trade focus onto some of the closest U.S. allies, the European Union. During the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, he proposed tariffs on auto imports from the EU, on wines, cheese, yogurt, and handbags from France, and on whiskies from Ireland.”

In the News item

Should You Vote? The Answer Isn’t As Obvious As You Might Think

January 31st, 2020

It seems my friend Jason Brennan, a philosopher at Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business, has blasphemed. Perhaps I shouldn’t be surprised that the author of books titled The Ethics of Voting, Against Democracy, and When All Else Fails: The Ethics of Resistance to State Injustice has controversial and unpopular opinions. The reaction to his most recent heresy, however, are fascinating and more than a bit puzzling.

In the News item

The Ins And Outs Of Board Service: What We Now Know

January 31st, 2020

Of course, the financial health of the company is a critical point to assess, but we were all a bit surprised by the depth of financial forensics our mentors suggest we undertake. Prior to the program, there would have been a tendency to focus on a company’s general development strategy, strategic planning, management teams, cash on hand, cap tables, and risks. Patricia Fairfield, Ph.D., associate professor, McDonough School of Business at Georgetown University, however, said there is much to learn from a company’s deeper numbers. She walked us through several examples of earnings releases and company financials, calling out trends or items to focus on to determine the real economic health and trajectory of a company.

In the News item

Super Bowl To Feature Trump, Bloomberg And Corporate America Battling For Attention

January 31st, 2020

The marketing world is seeing a breaking down of boundaries between ads and politics, said Christie Nordhielm, a professor of marketing at Georgetown University. “No network wants to have political ads on when people are trying to be entertained, but no network will turn down $5.6 million either,” she said, adding the campaign commercials will be a “downer” on the viewer experience.

In the News item

Why We’re All So Worried About Having Too Little Time

January 30th, 2020

Of course, these experiences require that we actually take time off–not easy in a culture obsessed with productivity. After all, 55% of Americans don’t use all their paid vacation time. But researchers say sometimes it’s about reframing how we think about leisure activities. Columbia’s Silvia Bellezza, Harvard’s Anat Keinan and Georgetown’s Neeru Paharia have found that a “functional alibi” can be helpful: we’re more likely to go camping if we acknowledge it will be good for our productivity at work.

In the News item

Opinion: Turn On The TAP For Incarcerated New Yorkers

January 28th, 2020

An op-ed by George Chocos, assistant director of program management, Executive Education: “In 2001, I was one of over 70,000 people in what was then called the New York State Department of Correctional Services. This was six years after the 1994 Crime Bill ended Pell Grant eligibility for people in prison. One year later, New York followed suit, ending the Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) for incarcerated students.”

In the News item

Sustainable Investing Matters Tactically As Well As Morally

January 23rd, 2020

“[F]or-profit impact investing is significant because it leverages the powerful forces of capitalism to address challenges at a scale that governments and nonprofits can’t match,” notes Leslie Crutchfield, executive director of Georgetown University’s Business for Impact. “Consider that the total economic activity of corporations ($23.1 trillion) dwarfs that of government ($3.1 trillion) and of the nonprofit sector ($1.2 trillion).”

In the News item

How Gender Equality Can Be Achieved At Business School

January 18th, 2020

According to ‘Iolani L. Bullock, director of MBA admissions at Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business, today’s companies want to hire graduates who know how to work in a diverse and inclusive environment. She’s currently working towards a gender balanced program at McDonough.

In the News item

FLASH FRIDAY: Re-Imagining Reg NMS

January 17th, 2020

Reg NMSs influence has extended beyond U.S. market centers. The rest of the world is moving towards a Reg NMS framework, said James Angel, associate professor at Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business. Europe is trying to harmonize banks, and there have been similar efforts in Canada, Australia, and Japan, Angel noted. Regulatory thinking has gone towards a Reg NMS world.

In the News item

What It Takes To Make Clothes In The USA

January 17th, 2020

Production rapidly shifted away from the U.S. in the 1990s, when about half of the nation’s clothing was domestically manufactured, says Pietra Rivoli, an economist at Georgetown University and author of “The Travels of a T-Shirt in the Global Economy.”

In the News item

Your Vote Almost Certainly Won’t Matter. On Election Day, Work And Donate Your Earnings.

January 17th, 2020

An op-ed by Jason Brennan, Robert J. and Elizabeth Flanagan Family Term Associate Professor: “Voting looks and feels good, but it does not mean you have done any good. If you want to help others, spend Election Day working and then donate your earnings to a GiveWell.org charity. You’ll do thousands of times more good than any voter.”

In the News item

Episode 10: Finding God In Business

January 15th, 2020

Prof. Robert Bies of Georgetown’s McDonough School of Business joins us for a conversation about the intersection of faith and business. We address such questions as: Why are faith and business often perceived to be incompatible? What is the importance of power and influence skills? How can we think about decision-making from a Catholic and Ignatian perspective?

In the News item

BlackRock’s Fink Pressed To Take Action Over Words In Dumping Fossil Fuels

January 15th, 2020

Fink’s pledges — including a “commitment to accountability,” proxy pressure on boards and actions to avoid thermal fossil fuels — “have teeth” compared to a high-level commentary on sustainability only a year earlier, said Leslie Crutchfield, executive director at Georgetown University’s Business for Impact center. “Yes, more-progressive advocates for [environmental, social and governance] investing will say BlackRock is late to the parade, but this [year’s letter] is not lip service.”

In the News item

Everything You Need To Know To File Your 2019 Taxes

January 7th, 2020

Thomas Cooke, a business professor at Georgetown University, said the tax law changes for 2019 are minimal. Without the spending package passed by Congress in December, we’d be holding steady with the changes already implemented via the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) of 2017.

In the News item

Who Benefits When State Governments Award Incentives To Politically-Connected Companies?

January 7th, 2020

An article by Allison Koester, Saleh Romeih Associate Professor of Business Administration, and Reining Petacchi, Dottie and Tim Hobin Associate Professor of Business Administration: “Our research considers the power of the state in shaping its citizens’ economic landscape by studying the US state governments’ use of corporate economic incentives, and how corporate political connections influence the likelihood, magnitude, and outcomes associated with incentive awards. Our analyses indicate that US state economic incentives are disproportionately awarded to politically-connected companies, even though these awards appear to be a less effective use of taxpayer-provided funds. Thus, nearly 50 years after Stigler’s pivotal article was published, we find that his words continue to ring true.”

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