Faculty News

Georgetown McDonough's faculty are known worldwide for their research, expertise, and commitment to their students. They regularly lend their knowledge to the media, hearings on Capitol Hill, and to leading organizations.

McDonough Faculty News

In the News item

Vaccine Distribution Will be an ‘Enormous Logistical Problem’: David Rubenstein

November 16th, 2020

David Rubenstein, co-founder and co-executive chairman of the Carlyle Group, joins CNBC’s “Squawk Box” team to discuss how the market is anticipating vaccine distribution and if he thinks there will be disappointments along the way of the economic recovery. [He spoke of these topics at the Financial Markets Quality conference hosted by the Center for Financial Markets and Policy later that day].

In the News item

SEC Chairman Clayton to Step Down

November 16th, 2020

James Angel, associate professor of finance at Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business, told ThinkAdvisor Monday in an email that he doubts “the lame duck Trump administration will try to ram through his [Clayton’s] nomination” to the Southern District of New York post.

In the News item

Biden to Talk More Softly Toward China, but Keep Trump’s Big Tariff ‘Stick’

November 11th, 2020

“I think it would be impractical for Biden to do any tariff reductions immediately. I don’t think he has the latitude to remove them right away,” said Charles Skuba, a professor at Georgetown and former senior official at the U.S. International Trade Administration . “He also has some chips to play. You could consider the tariffs as a gift to Biden.”

In the News item

Yes, Virtual Presenting Is Weird

November 4th, 2020

An article by Sarah Gershman, adjunct professor: Recently, I worked with a CEO who told me that she dreads giving virtual presentations. “I used to enjoy getting up in front of an audience,” she explained. “I loved working the room. Now, I feel like I’m speaking into a black hole.”

In the News item

Analysis: Retail Traders Position for Volatility After U.S. Election

November 3rd, 2020

The surge of new retail investors benefits the market in many ways, such as promoting financial literacy and bringing more attention to a wider variety of companies than institutional investors tend to focus on, said James Angel, a finance professor at Georgetown University.

coin telegraph

In the News item

Happy Birthday Dear Bitcoin: Crypto’s First White Paper Turns 12

October 31st, 2020

James Angel, an associate professor at Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business, told Coin Telegraph: “It has set in motion a revolution in finance with the rise of DeFi apps, smart contracts, and coin offerings, in addition to a payment revolution that is leading to central bank digital currencies.”

In the News item

How COVID-19 May Affect Spectator Sports in the Coming Years

October 28th, 2020

Covid-19’s impact on spectator sports this year has been obvious. Marty Conway, a longtime sports executive who teaches sports management and marketing at Georgetown University explains what the impact will be as the pandemic continues, and whether the impact will last when the pandemic ends.

bloomberg law

In the News item

Hedge Funds’ Shot at Stock Secrecy Fades as SEC Drops Revamp

October 27th, 2020

“This shows the value of the public comment process,” said James Angel, a finance professor at Georgetown University who wrote a letter to the SEC opposing the rule change. “More people should monitor what our regulators are proposing and submit comments. The SEC is a political agency, and they do pay attention to public opinion.”

In the News item

Widening Racial Gap Evident In Jobs Confidence, Economic Optimism

October 16th, 2020

“Historically, during recessions and downturns, inequality increases,” said Rohan Williamson, a finance professor at the Georgetown University McDonough School of Business. During the pandemic, the jobs most impacted have been service jobs, he explained—and those jobs are more likely to be held by non-white workers.

In the News item

Why There is No Ethical Reason Not to Vote (Unless You Come Down with COVID-19 on Election Day)

October 8th, 2020

According to a recent study by the 100 Million Project, nonvoters are twice as likely as active voters to say they do not feel they have enough information about candidates and issues to decide how to vote. This group of nonvoters might believe that it is unethical to vote because they are uninformed. In The Ethics of Voting, political philosopher Jason Brennan argues that uninformed citizens have an ethical obligation not to cast votes, because their uninformed votes can produce results that damage our political system.

News Story

Q&A: Meet Chunky the Georgetown Panda!

September 30th, 2020

You may have seen him in your classes or appearing on Instagram and various locations across the United States visiting fellow Hoyas. Though he may b…

In the News item

How The Turmoil With TikTok Could Change The Course Of Big Tech

September 18th, 2020

While TikTok’s announcement is a big story, Betsy Sigman, professor at Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business, points out that it’s far from a done deal. Partnering with Oracle makes some sense, since Oracle CEO Larry Ellison is one of the only Silicon Valley tech leaders to vocally support Trump. “This could also help position Oracle well for the ongoing period of trade wars between China and the US, and expand into cloud operations and advertising,” Betsy adds.

In the News item

Rude Work Emails Are Bad for Your Health and on the Rise – Here’s What You Need To Know

September 14th, 2020

In 1998, one-fourth of employees polled said they were treated rudely at least once a week. By 2016 that figure had risen to 62%. Indeed, 98% have reported uncivil behavior of some sort. A number of factors are to blame, says Christine Porath, a leading academic in the field of workplace incivility. These include an increasing sense of isolation, as well as poor communications.

In the News item

China and U.S. Relations

September 13th, 2020

In January, Chinese and American officials signed a trade pact that keeps commerce between the world’s two largest economies flowing. The agreement came despite the bilateral relationship deteriorating in other areas. Mike Walter talks with Georgetown University business professor, Arthur Dong, about the future of Chinese and U.S. relations.

In the News item

Former Deutsche Bank Traders to Stand Trial in Test of Spoofing Crackdown

September 11th, 2020

Some critics have questioned whether spoofing should be prosecuted as a crime, instead of a civil regulatory violation handled by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission. Deutsche Bank paid $30 million in 2018 to settle CFTC claims tied to the traders’ spoofing. Other experts say the Justice Department’s attention is warranted because manipulation affects commodity prices as well as correlated assets, such as stocks. “It is basically lying to people about their willingness to trade and lying about the liquidity in the market,” said James Angel, a finance professor and regulatory expert at Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business.

In the News item

Xbox Series S vs PS5: Does the Cheapest Console Always Win?

September 11th, 2020

This means the Xbox Series S will be a “no brainer” purchase for those in the market for a new games console, according to Luc Wathieu, professor of marketing from Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business. “The Xbox Series S’s price is what I have called in my research a ‘no-brainer price’ – a price so low that it suppresses buyer’s incentives to think deeply about differences in features,” he tells WIRED. “This price will kill most people’s appetite to actively compare the Xbox Series S with other more expensive, feature-rich alternatives, particularly Sony’s upcoming PS5.”

In the News item

Would Postal Banking Save the Post Office?

September 2nd, 2020

“Roughly 6% of the population is unbanked,” meaning they manage their money outside of traditional banks and credit unions, explains James Angel, a professor of finance at Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business. If the USPS revived postal banking, it could provide “a lifeline” to people who live in banking deserts where banks have closed branches or never opened them at all, he says.

In the News item

When Your Boss Doesn’t Respect Your Family Commitments

September 1st, 2020

When you work for a manager who doesn’t recognize your family obligations, your strategy must be multifaceted, says Ella F. Washington, professor at Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business and a consultant and coach at Ellavate Solutions. You need to figure out how to productively navigate the situation with your boss, while also collaborating with your colleagues and family to create a schedule and “set boundaries” that work for everyone. The goal is to “try to get your boss to meet you halfway,” she says.

shingo institute

News Story

Kasra Ferdows Receives Shingo Research Award

August 31st, 2020

Kasra Ferdows, Heisley Family Chair of Global Manufacturing at Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business, received the 2020 Shingo R…

In the News item

Five Myths About Manufacturing

August 28th, 2020

An op-ed by Kasra Ferdows, Heisley Family Chair and professor of global manufacturing: Despite the much-touted rise of the service industry, manufacturing remains central to the world economy: It generated $13.8 trillion in economic value worldwide in 2019, according to the World Bank, representing 15 percent of the world’s gross domestic product. Its distribution across the globe is a source of never-ending political debate. … Yet myths about this sector persist — and they can lead to expensive subsidies, friction between nations and higher prices for consumers.

In the News item

Fed Pledges To Look at if the Economy is Working for Lower-Income Communities When Setting Policy

August 27th, 2020

The Federal Reserve changed its inflation policy from a set 2% target, to a more flexible policy that would be based on an average inflation target, allowing for higher inflation temporarily. On Wall Street, stocks moved higher last week, as traders bet the new inflation policy means the Federal Reserve’s zero interest rate policy will be in place even longer. “The big issue is that the Federal Reserve really wants to nurture a strong recovery for Main Street and is putting in place the apparatus for Wall Street to understand that,” said Paul McCulley, adjunct professor at the McDonough School of Business.

In the News item

As International Students Look Beyond U.S., The D.C. Region Could See an Economic Hit

August 26th, 2020

Prashant Malaviya, a senior associate dean of MBA programs and a professor of marketing, tells WAMU that international students bring an invaluable social and cultural understanding to U.S. campuses. He says their MBA program promises students a “global education” and having an international classroom is one way to do that.

In the News item

Howard County Cancer Survivor Launches Nonprofit to Deliver Support Kits to Those Going Through Treatment

August 26th, 2020

After receiving an unexpected care package from a cancer survivor, Sonia Su (SFS’20) decided to return the favor by founding the nonprofit Kits to Heart, delivering care packages to cancer patients in area hospitals. During her spring semester at Georgetown University this year, working toward a master’s degree in Asian studies, Su took three entrepreneurship classes and then participated in the Georgetown Entrepreneurship Challenge. Jeff Reid, a professor and founding director of the Georgetown Entrepreneurship Challenge, said the program is the largest offered for aspiring entrepreneurs at Georgetown.

In the News item

The ‘Warping Effects’ of Philanthropy

August 25th, 2020

Leslie Crutchfield, executive director of Business for Impact speaks with The Chronicle of Philanthropy to discuss the rapid change in social movements and philanthropy. “Seeding and growing vast networks of millions of passionate individuals organized around a common cause is infinitely more powerful than any single organization or association, no matter how well-resourced…” said Crutchfield.

In the News item

Here’s Why More Companies are Filing Confidential IPO Paperwork

August 25th, 2020

With Airbnb filing paperwork for an initial public offering last week, it became the latest of many companies to pursue a confidential IPO, which experts say allows for more flexibility and can be more advantageous than the traditional route of filing an S-1 months ahead of time. Companies like Uber and Lyft are the “two posterchildren for using this strategy,” as well as others like Spotify, Slack and Palantir, says Sandeep Dahiya, associate professor of entrepreneurship at Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business.

In the News item

Minority Entrepreneurs at a Tipping Point as Black-Owned Banks Dwindle in the U.S.

August 25th, 2020

“The lack of access to capital is the single highest driver for business failure, and Black founders are less likely to gain it,” said Melissa Bradley, Georgetown McDonough School of Business professor. Black and brown business owners have faced a disproportionate share of Covid-19 failures: from February to April of this year, there was a 41% decline in Black-owned businesses and a 32% drop in Latinx business owners.

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