Archive: Faculty

  • Being Busy Is a New Status Symbol

    An op-ed by Neeru Paharia, assistant professor of marketing: Movies, magazines, and popular television shows often highlight the abundance of money and leisure time among the wealthy. For example, in the television show “Downton Abbey,” Violet Crawley, the Dowager Countess of Grantham, asks “What is a ‘weekend?,” because she has no notion that people work for five days then take a two day break. According to Thorstein Veblen, a famous scholar who theorized about the lives of the wealthy, the rich signal their status to others not only by wasting money on functionally useless products (e.g. diamonds) but also by wasting their time. The wealthy can spend time on leisure because they do not need to work.

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  • Trump’s Tough Talk Does Little to Deter North Korea

    “It makes it a little difficult to continue to be talking about, ‘Oh, you better watch out, North Korea, we’re going to get you,’” said James Moore, a former assistant secretary of Commerce with experience in the region who is now a professor at Georgetown’s McDonough School of Business. “Our options are really very limited.”

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  • Antitrust Is Back — But The Media Industry Doesn’t Need It

    An op-ed by Larry Downes, project director, Center for Business and Public Policy: “After decades of relative obscurity, antitrust is back in the headlines. Late last week, for example, the Federal Trade Commission announced it would not block Amazon’s acquisition of Whole Foods, setting off a storm of outrage from armchair legal commentators.”

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  • GE’s Jeff Immelt as Uber CEO Would Bring Stability and Outsider Status

    Georgetown University professor Jason Schloetzer, who specializes in CEO succession and corporate governance, says Immelt did not leave GE on his own terms and Uber represents a chance to leave the business world on top. “Uber is a mess but also a unique opportunity to show your CEO prowess by bringing that company stability and focus,” he says. “The downside is dealing with a board that does not have a holistic vision for the company’s next step.”

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  • Canada Needs Blood Plasma. We Should Pay Donors to Get It

    An op-ed by Peter Jaworski, assistant teaching professor: “Canada buys the overwhelming majority of its plasma-protein products from American, for-profit companies that attract plasma donors by paying them. In 2016, Canadian Blood Services collected only 17 per cent of the total plasma it needs for essential plasma-products. To cover the shortfall, Canadian taxpayers spent 23 million buying just one of these products, immune globulin.”

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  • Two People In The D.C. Region Are Million Lottery Winners After Wednesday’s Powerball Drawing

    As folks in D.C. folks got caught up in Powerball fever during that time, Allan Eberhart of Georgetown University advised people to do practical things with their winnings like meeting with a financial advisor, making wise investments, and, most surprisingly, keep their day job.

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  • Jay Y. Who? Samsung Verdict May Not Matter to Family Businesses

    “Regardless of the outcome of the case, the facts clearly demonstrate a clear lack of leadership and taking responsibility,” said Thomas Cooke, professor at Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business. “By his own testimony, Jay Y. Lee admits this.”

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  • Let’s Dance in the Rain

    On certain occasions and for a limited time, freedom can be sold and bought. According to Michael Czinkota, a professor at Georgetown University and the University of Kent, freedom is an effect of international marketing. “Freedom is about options. If there is no alternative, there is no freedom. A true alternative provides the opportunity to make a decision, to exercise virtue. Another key dimension of freedom is not to confine, but to allow people to go outside of the box. As a concept, freedom knows no international boundaries. But national borders usually are the box where business and government find their limits.”

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  • Enough Was Finally Enough for CEOs on Trump’s Advisory Councils

    An op-ed by Marlene Towns, adjunct professor of marketing: “Brand managers are the protectors of their respective brands. Companies go to great lengths to protect their investment in the brand and the equity built over years of careful marketing by closely monitoring the associations made and the company the brand keeps. While brand ambassadors or affiliating one’s brand with a particular event or entity can be an effective promotion tool, it is always one to be taken with great caution.”

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  • These CEOs Stuck by Trump as Others Defected. Then He Dumped Them.

    Hewson’s refusal to leave — an argument the Lockheed Martin chief should stick around for influence — probably won’t damage her image in the long run, said Robert Bies, a professor of management at Georgetown University. “That is a principled stance, as much as a principled stance as people leaving,” he said. “We need to engage with people, in this case the president, if we’re going to have any influence.”

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