Building upon more than 400 years of Jesuit tradition, Georgetown McDonough educates students to be principled leaders ready to tackle the world’s most complex challenges.

The Society of Jesus, known as the Jesuits, has been an integral part of Georgetown University throughout its history, united in the common spirit of learning and faith that characterize the Jesuit educational tradition of curiosity, inquiry, and reason. With a strong moral and ethical grounding, Georgetown’s McDonough School of Business continues this tradition by preparing disciplined and discerning business professionals with a clear sense of purposeful leadership.

Georgetown University began with the vision of John Carroll, an American-born, European-educated Jesuit priest who returned to the United States in 1773 to establish a preeminent institution of higher learning based in the Jesuit tradition. In 1789, Bishop Carroll acquired land overlooking the Potomac River outside the village of George-Town and founded the Academy at George-Town, later Georgetown University.

As the oldest Catholic and Jesuit university founded in the United States, Georgetown is distinctive for its longtime commitment to the values of the Jesuit tradition. These include the integration of learning, faith and service; care for the whole person; character and conviction; religious truth and interfaith understanding; and a commitment to building a more just world.

Georgetown’s Jesuit tradition is evident throughout the McDonough School of Business curriculum and student life:

  • Students take courses rooted in principled leadership, service learning, and developing a global mindset.
  • Service to others is woven into curricular and co-curricular activities, such as the Month of Volunteerism, national and international service trips, service-oriented student clubs, and recognition of MBA community fellows at graduation.
  • There is a collaborative culture where students, faculty, staff, and alumni look after one another.
  • Father Ron Anton, a Jesuit priest, serves as the school’s senior advisor for Jesuit identity.
  • The school is launching new initiatives, like the innovative Pivot Program for returning citizens or the Executive Master's in Leadership for D.C. Public School Leaders, to be in service to our local community.
  • Dean Paul Almeida was educated in Catholic and Jesuit schools around the world, leading him to find a home at Georgetown.

[Read Dean Almeida’s Financial Times article about how the teachings of St. Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Jesuits, are relevant to business education today.]

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    Sweetgreen Founders Reflect on Success

    Sweetgreen founders and Georgetown McDonough School of Business alumni Jonathan Neman (B’07), Nicolas Jammet (B’07), and Nathaniel Ru (B’07) returned to campus April 16 for a conversation about their 12 years of success and how their mission to connect people to real food has grown beyond the salads they make.

  • Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities logo
    Creating a Culture of Collaboration at Georgetown University

    As the world becomes more interconnected and complex, so do the major issues facing society today. Paul Almeida, dean of Georgetown's McDonough School of Business, explains how the university is creating new collaborations through its colleges and schools to solve local (and global) challenges together.

  • 2019 First Year Seminar winning teams
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    Small class sizes, a focus on teamwork, and a semester-long case competition are defining features of Georgetown McDonough’s selective First Year Seminar program, celebrating its ninth anniversary in 2018-2019.